5.6) How can I connect my Atari to a high speed/Ethernet network?

Two options are presented here:
  - Option #1 is a generic LAN/RS-232 interface from Lantronix
  - Option #2 is a native ethernet interface for the Atari

Option #1
=-=-=-=-=
Marius Diepenhorst pioneered the use of Lantronix devices.  He writes (2004):

  "Try to get a Lantronix UDS-10 device.  It acts like a modem but it is a LAN
  -> RS-232 converter.  So with that device you can have incoming and outgoing
  'calls' like modem ones via the Internet.

  I ran my Atari 8-bit BBS with such a thing.  The Lantronix UDS-10 or MSS100
  will do too.  But in that case you have to make a custom RS-232 cable (easy
  job)."

Lantronix UDS-10 official:
http://www.lantronix.com/device-networking/external-device-servers/uds-10.html

Other, similar serial-to-Ethernet interfaces from Lantronix have been
successfully utilized, including the discontinued MSS100
(http://www.lantronix.com/support/discontinued/mss100.html) and MSS1-T.

Lantronix UDS1100, successor to the earlier UDS-10 and MSS100:
http://preview.tinyurl.com/yo3qmz

Option #2
=-=-=-=-=
The Atari 8-Bit Ethernet Project is developing a hardware/software solution
that will be able to connect to the internet via an Atari 8-bit Ethernet
Cartridge.

The hardware and software was originally developed by Chris Martin and tested
by Mark Dusko.  The software is based on the work already done in the
Commodore 64 community, this adapter will allow you to take advantage of
telnet, e-mail, web browsing and a web server via the Contiki Operating System
and a Ciris Logic CS8900A ethernet controller chip.

The main component is called the IP Dragon II; the official cartridge name is
the Dragon Cart.

Project website: http://www.atari8ethernet.com/
About Us - Contact - Credits - Powered with Webdev - © Atarimania 2003-2018