Desktop Entertainment Pack Volume 1

Search
Votes / Statistics
Rating 
N/A
Hits: 1,634
Downloads: 854
Votes: 0
My Atarimania
Bookmark and Share
Comments (0)

Screenshots - Desktop Entertainment Pack Volume 1

Desktop Entertainment Pack Volume 1 atari screenshot
Desktop Entertainment Pack Volume 1 atari screenshot
Desktop Entertainment Pack Volume 1 atari screenshot

Information - Desktop Entertainment Pack Volume 1

GenreVariousYear1993
Language[unknown]PublisherST Format
ControlsMouseDistributorFuture Publishing
Players1 vs. 2, 1Developer[n/a]
ResolutionLow / Medium / High / VGA / RGBLicensed from
Programmer(s)

Szekely, G. A.

CountryUnited Kingdom
Graphic Artist(s)

Szekely, G. A.

SoftwareEnglish
Game design

Szekely, G. A.

Box / InstructionsEnglish
Musician(s)

[n/a]

LicensePD / Freeware / Shareware
Sound FX

[n/a]

Serial
Cover Artist(s)ST TypeST, STe, TT, Falcon030 / 0.5MB
MIDIVersion
Dumpdownload atari Desktop Entertainment Pack Volume 1 Download / MSANumber of Disks1 / Double-Sided
Protection

Instructions - Desktop Entertainment Pack Volume 1

              Desktop Entertainment Pack¿ - Volume 1
         Game accessories for the Atari ST & TT Computer
                              ½ by
                          G.A. Szekely



                          Introduction

     Desktop Entertainment Pack is a collection of three game 
accessories for the Atari ST and TT computers.  Each game was 
designed to appeal to children between 5 and 13 years of age.  
Each volume contains a computer adaptation of three timeless 
games that children of this age group have been playing for 
decades.  Volume one contains:  Puzzle Slide where the player 
tries to put fifteen sliding tiles in alphabetical order,  Tic 
Tac Toe, and a variation of the board game Othello called Flip 
Flop.  Each game can work in any desktop screen resolution (low, 
medium or high), and uses simple sound effects to make the game 
more interesting.  Puzzle slide is a single player game, but both 
Tic Tac Toe, and Flip Flop are two player games.  In the two 
player games, you can play another person, or test your skill by 
matching wits with the computer, or just for fun, watch the 
computer try to beat itself!


                           Background

     Each of the games from the Desktop Entertainment Pack series 
can be run as a standard program or as a desktop accessory 
program.  A desktop accessory is what is known as a "terminate 
but stay resident" program.  What this means, is that when the 
computer is turned on, the programs are automatically loaded into 
the computer's memory.  After some initialization work, the 
program returns control back to the computer.  But, the accessory 
program actually stays in the computer memory, so that you can 
instantly call on it to play a game.  And, the best part is, that 
the game is exactly the way you left it.  So you can play the 
game for a while, quit in the middle of a game and then you can 
run another program or accessory.  When you want to jump back to 
the accessory game, it will be exactly as you last left it.

     The Atari ST and TT line of computers can handle up to six 
desktop accessories at one time.  A desktop accessory can not 
only be called from the green desktop when you first turn on your 
program, but they can also be called from inside any GEM program 
that has a menu bar across the top of the screen.  So, for 
example, if you were using your favorite GEM based word processor 
to type up a report and wanted to take a break to play a game, 
you could pull up any of the games from the Desktop Entertainment 
Pack.  When you've finished playing the game, you can go back to 
typing your report right where you left off.  You can even have 
up to six games on the screen at once and take turns making moves 
against the computer in each game.  In fact, if you put six 
copies of the same desktop accessory game (for example Tic Tac 
Toe) on a disk, each with a different file name, you can 
simultaneously play six different Tic Tac Toe games against the 
computer.


              How to Run Game as a Standard Program

     To run one of the games as a standard program, rename the 
game from whatever.ACC to whatever.PRG.  Then double click the 
program with the mouse pointer as you would any other program.


             How to Run Game as a Desktop Accessory

     To use a desktop accessory, put the disk that contains your 
desktop accessories in floppy disk drive A and turn on your 
computer.  (If you have a hard disk, you need to copy your 
accessories to the root directory of drive C).  The desktop 
accessories will automatically load into the computers memory 
when you turn the computer on.  To activate an accessory, move 
your mouse pointer to the top left of the menu bar to the word 
"Desk".  A list of all the accessories that where loaded into the 
computer will be displayed.  To select a desktop accessory, 
position the mouse button over top of the name of the game 
accessory that you would like and press the left mouse button.  
The game accessory will pop up in the center of the screen if 
this is the first time you selected this particular game.  If you 
selected the accessory before, it will pop up where ever on the 
screen you last left the game if this is not the first time you 
selected this particular game accessory.

     Only one desktop accessory at a time can be the active 
desktop accessory. Whichever desktop accessory is active will 
have a white and gray striped bar along the top of the desktop 
accessory window where the name of the desktop accessory appears.  
All non-active desktop accessories will have a white bar across 
the top.  When you open any desktop accessory, it becomes the 
active desktop accessory.  If you have more than one desktop 
accessory on the screen at a time, you can select which one you 
want to be active by moving the mouse pointer over top of the 
desired desktop accessory, and press the left mouse button.

     You can move the active desktop accessory around on the 
screen by positioning the mouse pointer on top of the stripped 
bar along the top of the active desktop accessory.  Pushing and 
holding down the left mouse button, and moving the mouse, you can 
move the desktop accessory window around on the screen.  Whenever 
you release the mouse button, the desktop accessory window 
remains where ever it is.

     You can close or remove an accessory from the desktop by 
positioning the mouse pointer over the close box in the upper 
left hand corner of the desktop accessory window.  If you 
re-activate the desktop accessory by selecting it from under the 
desktop label of the menu bar, it will appear on the screen where 
you last left it.


                          Puzzle Slide  

     The purpose of the game Puzzle Slide is to slide fifteen 
squares labeled A through O around on the board to get them in 
alphabetical order.  The empty square on the board is represented 
by a black area.  To move a letter square into the empty space, 
position the mouse pointer to the left, right, above or below the 
empty space and press the left mouse button.  More than one 
square may be be slid toward the empty space at one time, by 
clicking the mouse on a square further left, right, above or 
below the empty space.  Clicking the mouse on a square that is 
not left, right, above or below the empty space has no effect.

     Puzzle Slide uses 21.1 kbytes of computer memory.



                           Tic Tac Toe

     Tic Tac Toe is a computer version of the ever popular game 
of the same name.  Tic Tac Toe is a two player game where you can 
play against another person, test your skill against the 
computer, or just for fun watch the computer play itself.  By 
selecting setup from the menu on the right side of the game, you 
can select who is X, who is O, who goes first and who goes 
second, and whether each player is human or a computer.  You can 
also enter your name in by clicking on the name field at the top 
of the player menu and typing in your name.

     When a human player is to make the first move, simply use 
the mouse to click on the desired location of the move.  When the 
computer is to move first, the start button on the right side of 
the game must be pressed.  In addition to using the mouse to 
point and click to where you would like to make a move, you can 
use the number keys 1-9 on the numeric keypad on the right side 
of your Atari computer to select a move.

     Pressing the start button any time after the game has been 
started causes the current game to be declared a draw, and a new 
game to be started.  When the game is over, the next game may be 
started by pressing anywhere on the playing board.  The player 
that moves first will alternate with each game, regardless of who 
won the last game.

     By clicking the mouse on the last move you made, you can 
undo the last move.  This is particularly useful to teach young 
players how to play the game.  You can check how many games were 
won by each player by selecting score from the right side of the 
game window.  The game that you are currently playing will show 
up as a tie.  Since even the last move can be taken over, a game 
is not counted as over until the next game has been started.

     Tic Tac Toe uses 37.9 kbytes of computer memory.



                            Flip Flop

     Flip Flop is a computer game similar to the board game 
Othello.  The game starts with two white and two black playing 
pieces already on the board.  One player's colored pieces on the 
board are white, and the other player's pieces are black.  Each 
player takes turns placing a playing piece of his color on the 
board.  You can only place your colored piece on the board next 
to an opponent's colored piece already on the board.  After you 
make a move, all of your opponent's colored playing pieces 
between the playing piece you just put down on the board and any 
of the other playing pieces that are your color on the board are 
flipped over to your color.  The object of the game is to have 
more pieces of your color, than of your opponents color, on the 
board at the end of the game.

     Flip Flop is a two player game where you can play against 
another person, test your skill against the computer, or just for 
fun watch the computer play itself.  By selecting setup from the 
menu on the right side of the game, you can select who is the 
black color and who is the white color, who goes first and who 
goes second, and whether each player is human or a computer.  You 
can also enter your name in by clicking on the name field at the 
top of the player menu and typing in your name.  Selecting the 
help button from the right side of the game board will give you a 
brief description of the game and the object of the game. 

     When a human player is to make the first move, simply use 
the mouse to click on the desired location of the move.  When the 
computer is to move first, the start button on the right side of 
the game must be pressed.  By pressing the start button any time 
after the game has been started causes the current game to be 
declared a draw, and a new game to be started.  When the game is 
over, the next game may be started by pressing anywhere on the 
playing board.  The player that moves first will alternate with 
each game, regardless of who won the last game.

     By clicking the mouse on the last move you made, you can 
undo the last move.  This is particularly useful to teach young 
players how to play the game.  You can check how many games were 
won by each player by selecting score from the right side of the 
game window.  The game that you are currently playing will show 
up as a tie.  Since even the last move can be taken over, a game 
is not counted as over until the next game has been started.

     Flip Flop uses 40.5 kbytes of computer memory.

About Us - Contact - Credits - Powered with Webdev - © Atarimania 2003-2022